Posts Tagged ‘Online Forensic Nursing introduction course’

Wife beating/Wife battering

January 5, 2012

Violence against women has been a long-standing problem and unfortunately been incorporated as an accepted practice in some cultures. The two terms are not interchangeable but are two separate concepts of unacceptable behavior ranging from physical, sexual and emotional abuse as well as emotional deprivation against a spouse or significant other. Wife beating, sometimes thought to be more frequent, is physical aggression that occurs in 85% of industrialized countries according to the text. On the other hand, wife battering is repeated assault with the intent of the abuser to maintain complete control of the female. This situation escalates in severity and frequency and could lead to homicide. Control issues or cultural beliefs may be some of the factors that lead to these situations. For example, the Hispanic culture has the very strong machismo trait of male domination and the Native Americans are also the domineering males although, interestingly, they are a matriarchal society in that the Clan Mothers have a voice in many important issues, at least in the Iroquois Nation here in New York State with whom I have many close friends. Both beating and battering cause physical and mental problems, and should raise a flag of suspicion for the forensic trained nurse. Both require assessment and intervention to prevent the female from becoming a statistic. According to the text Forensic Nursing by Lynch, 49 studies from 36 countries showed the highest prevalence (up to 52%) of wife beating/wife battering among the Arabs, Palestinians, in Nicaragua, Korea and New Zealand. “Other relatively high prevalence areas included Antigua, Barbados, Egypt, Ethiopia, Bangladesh, India, Kenya, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, Uganda, Turkey and [surprisingly] the UK” Lynch and Duvall (p. 54, 2006). The US, Switzerland, Canada, Philippines and South Africa were much less at 20% to 30%. Norway, Paraguay, Puerto Rico, Cambodia, South Africa and Zimbabwe were only between 10 and 20%. Being a native Norwegian, I can speak to this, since Scandinavia is largely a matriarchal society, based on its Viking heritage. I suppose this stems from the days when the women were left on their own to raise their large families while the men went to sea and therefore had to become independent! References Lynch, Virginia A. and Duvall, Janet Barbara. (2006). Forensic Nursing. (p.56-58). Elsevier Mosby: St. Louis.

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Save Our Children, Save Our Society

December 18, 2011

It has been common belief and practice that the only way to rid society of crime was the execution of offenders. This practice, however, has not had a significant impact in deterring criminal activity. In fact, violent crime seems to be even more proliferative. Studies have shown that the vast majority of violent offenders and serial killers were abused physically and psychologically as children. We must not treat crime as an isolated criminal justice issue, but rather a national public health problem. In order to formulate and institute a better approach to ending violence, attention must be turned to the importance of parenting and socialization of our children. Positive parenting should include the teaching of morals, motives, and social roles. It is also a necessity that we instruct children about their culture and how to live within it. The vital role of the forensic nurse is to utilize the components of nursing, science, and the law collaboratively in order to aid all victims in their medical treatment/recovery, provide proper/pertinent documentation of records for testimony in the apprehension of criminals, and promote programs for crime prevention/public safety. These interventions are the catalysts needed to help eliminate criminal activity, and begin the true healing of our society. References: Forensic Nursing by Virginia A. Lynch Forensic Nursing: a handbook for practice by Rita Hammer, Barbara Moynihan, Elaine M. Pagliaro

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Toxic Workplace, comment

December 18, 2011

Hi There Forensicnursingcourses,
This comment may be a little off-topic.

It was so painful for me as my wife Lil and I watched the events of September 11, 2001 on television. Seeing a plane hit the World Trade Center (WTC) North Tower at 8:46, then a second plane hit the South Tower at 9:02. Shortly, we saw the firefighters and other first responders courageously going into the buildings hoping to extinguish the fires, but it was impossible to foresee what followed.

Then we watched in shock as nearly a dozen people were jumping from the upper floors to their deaths.

We felt profound horror at 9:59 as the South Tower cascaded in freefall into its own footprint, and then 29 minutes later when the North Tower came down in the same impossible freefall way.

The new forensic evidence which is being released today by Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth demonstrates the presence of controlled demolition materiel in the World Trade Center buildings One and Two.

Just one week after September 11, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Christine Todd Whitman declared “I am glad to reassure the people of New York and Washington DC that their air is safe to breathe and their water is safe to drink” and that we “. . . need not be concerned about environmental issues as [we return to [our] homes and workplaces”.

Yet to this day, at least 900 first responders have since died as a result of the effects of toxic “dust” from the buildings and the some 3,000 human remains that enveloped lower Manhattan and which Mayor Rudolph Giuliani declared “We must clear the rubble”. This “rubble” in fact constituted evidence from a massive crime scene, but was hauled away, first to Long Island, and then was eventually placed on barges and shipped to China.

One thing I know is that the official government story of those events, as well as what took place that day at the Pentagon, is just that, a story. This story is not the truth, but far from it.

I was born on October 12, 1932. I am announcing today that I will be consuming only liquids beginning Sunday until my eightieth birthday in 2012 and until the real truth of what truly happened on that day emerges and is publicly known.
Thanks
erica678@hotmail.com

Original Posts
Toxic Workplace; December 14, 2011
Controlled Demolition Material

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Toxic Workplace

December 14, 2011

In an article by Dr. Holly Lucille, N.D., environmental toxins are brought up as a common health issue. Every day, workers all over the world are exposed to health threatening substances in plastics, pesticides, car exhaust, soaps, emulsifiers, health and beauty aids, household cleaning products and foods.

Your workplace exposure could increase the level of toxic substances, especially in older buildings which have not been properly maintained. Newer building built with toxic chemicals and that are constructed so tightly that insufficient fresh air is introduced into the building with poor ventilation, leaving allergens and irritants trapped inside. New installations, carpet, wall coverings, paint or construction can all heighten problems with VOCs. Toxic mold thriving in cool, damp, dark places behind walls and under carpeting. Construction products such as finishes, heavy duty cleaners, paints, thinners, dry cleaning fluids, some copiers and printers, some glues and adhesives, markers, and photo solutions are among some of the common office products that emit harmful volatile organic compounds (VOC).

This can be further amplified in atrium style buildings or buildings with interior water features, if inadequate care results in mold issues. Dander, molds, and dust mites are carried by animals and people into and throughout buildings. Occupational allergies are common. Many articles are written on “Sick Building Syndrome” and “Occupational Asthma.” where people have symptoms including watery eyes, runny nose, headaches, dizziness, nausea and tightening sensation in the chest. Most of these symptoms are that they have a distinct pattern of getting worse at work and improving on vacations or weekends.

Malfunctioning, inappropriate, or inefficient use of heating devices can produce irritating pollutants such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide at harmful levels. Formaldehyde exposure is widespread and found in resins in finishes, plywood, paneling, fiberboard and particleboard, and in some backings and adhesives for carpets. Common sources, such as malfunctioning, inappropriate, or inefficient use of heating devices, can produce irritating pollutants such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide at harmful levels. Formaldehyde exposure is widespread and found in resins in finishes, plywood, paneling, fiberboard and particleboard, and in some backings and adhesives for carpets.

Biological air pollutants like dander, molds, and dust mites are carried by animals and people into and throughout buildings. Scents and hairsprays, construction products such as finishes, heavy duty cleaners, paints, thinners, dry cleaning fluids, some copiers and printers, some glues and adhesives, markers, and photo solutions are among some of the common office products that emit harmful volatile organic compounds (VOC). New installations, carpet, wall coverings, paint or construction can all heighten problems with VOCs.

Bring a hepa or ionic style air purifier to work, keep area free of dust and clutter, increase your intake of pure water and increase your intake of antioxidants can aid your body in its ability to fight the toxins. In addition, speak with your company OSHA representative if the problem is too bad.

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Insomnia and the elderly

October 17, 2011

Not only is insomnia an issue for the healthy older adult, it can be even worse for the older adult with dementia as they frequently get their sleep/wake cycles confused. Families often call or present at the office requesting sleeping aids. These sleeping aids for healthy elders pose their own risks, but for a dementia patient these risks are increased. Sleep aids often cause confusion, which can lead to increased wander. With increased wandering, there is an increased potential for falls, especially if there are stairs in the home. The likelihood of a patient actually leaving the safety of the home is increased, with the very real possibility of becoming lost. Another issue associated with increased nighttime confusion is often frantic phone calls, most often to adult children/siblings, which can disrupt other households. These phone calls also are known to go to emergency response personnel requiring them to respond to the home for a non-emergency situation. For all these reasons, the use of sedative/hypnotics as sleep aids in the elderly, especially those with dementia, should usually be avoided at all costs. Other pharmacologic interventions, which have been found to be useful with fewer side effects, are trazadone or melatonin. These medications usually work, but the patient can develop a tolerance, requiring higher doses. These medications are not addictive, but higher doses increase side effects. Non- pharmacologic interventions include herbal teas or gentle massage, much as you would do to an infant’s back. The overall goal, of course is return the patient to the appropriate sleep/wake cycle. No one intervention is always effective, and several mat need to be tried. The use of sedative/hypnotics should always be used as an absolute last resort and only for very short periods of time.

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President Obama will not release public pictures of the dead Osama bin Laden

May 5, 2011

Is President Barack Obama correct on this decision not to release disfigured photos of the dead Osama Bin Laden? Yes, he is.

The spirit of international and US laws prohibit the public release of photos of the deceased. Note that the US is unhappy when pictures of dead Americans are broadcasted publicly.

Morally speaking, most Americans would not want pictures of their disfigured passed away loved one broadcasted publicly. The moral, social and spiritual beliefs of a victim and family members should be taken into account. Also the moral, social, and spiritual belief of the country in possession of the pictures should be taken into account.

Ethically speaking, members of the Forensic Medical and Nursing profession are not permitted to show public pictures of the deceased. This brings me to another point. Forensic physicians, nurses, and personnel should be involved with the handling of Osama bin Laden and others. Forensic healthcare personnel are trained to be objective. They will confirm the cause of death, the time of death, the identification, and identify extra factors. The forensic healthcare personnel are removed from political and military biases. Their training includes caring for victims of war on both sides and innocent bystanders.

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Reporter in Iraq’s life cut short not by a bullet but a “blood clot”

March 6, 2011

According to the New York Times of June 10, 2008, when David Bloom went to Iraq to report on the war his wife was worried he be felled by a bullet or a bomb. He was a victim of a rare genetic abnormality, factor V Leiden, called, factor V that caused a “blood clot” that lodged in his lungs and ended his life. Mr. Bloom also had three additional risk factors: immobility from a long plane ride, irregular eating habits (grabbing a bite when he could) due to his intense schedule and cramped sleeping areas in Army vehicles. If he had not had this rare disorder or if he knew about the disorder he would have been able to take prophylaxis treatment. Factor V disorder is responsible for about a third of cases of D.V.T, deep vein thrombosis, resulting in the veinous thrombosis advancing to the pulmonary embolism and his death. After his death investigation of family shows a cousin who suffered an MI in her forties had Factor V. His grandmother died in pregnancy from a clotting event. The abnormality can increase the risk of CVA, MI, cholelithiasis, pre-eclampsia, etc. Chapter 51 in one of my textbooks discusses drugs used to prevent formation of thrombi and to dissolve thrombi that have already formed by suppressing coagulation, inhibit platelet aggregation and promote clot dissolution. The drugs fall into three major categories: anticoagulants, antiplatelet drugs and thrombolytic drugs. Mr. Bloom would have most likely taken an antiplatelet drug, aspirin, as a preventative, had he only known of his risk.

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Mental Health Assessment in Forensic Nursing

March 3, 2011

Chapter 7 of Health Assessment for Nursing Practice discusses mental health and mental status assessment. This chapter correlates with Forensic Nursing in that the Forensic Nurse’s assessment needs to indicate the mental status of the client he/she is subjectively and objectively assessing.

The Forensic Nurse determines the client’s mental status by examining the client’s behavior, appearance, risk factors, interpersonal relationships and cognitive function. Vital signs are indicated as well in order to ascertain whether medical treatment is required. Past medical history, family history, drug and alcohol abuse, and medications that the client is using is also added.

The nurse assesses the client’s behavior and cognitive function in order to ascertain the client’s mental status. Is the client alert and oriented to person, place and time? Does the client appear anxious, withdrawn, or does the client’s mood appear appropriate to the situation? Is the client’s emotional state appropriate to the situation? Is the client displaying signs of paranoia, delusions of grandeur, obsessive compulsive actions, or bipolar episodes?

Is the client appropriately dressed for the weather? What is the client wearing? Is the client wearing outlandish dress and makeup or does the client display a lack of hygiene. Assess the posture of the client – Is the patient slumped in a chair and looking to the ground or is the client sitting upright and smiling? Is the client fidgeting or pacing the room? Does the client’s tone of voice indicate anxiety, anger, or is the client rambling with inappropriate sentences?

Risk factors involved include the client’s age, gender, family history, psychosocial environment and personal characteristics. Has the client had a past history of trauma, sexual or physical abuse, or alcoholism? Does the client display evidence of low self esteem?

Interpersonal relationships are indicated to establish the client’s social surroundings. Is the client in an abusive relationship? Does the client have family and friends that are supportive and that the client is able to discuss with them his/her feelings and problems? Does the client have a social phobia which inhibits him/her to avoid social situations?

Elevated blood pressure and pulse may indicate severe anxiety or panic. Assess respirations for dyspnea, tachypnea, or labored breathing. Decreased respirations may indicate depression with evidence of frequent, deep sighs.

Mental Status assessment is one of many observations that the Forensic Nurse incorporates in her nursing assessment. It can give valuable evidence of victim abuse, sexual assault and mental trauma.

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Alcohol addiction is a disease, comment

January 10, 2011

Alcohol is the most commonly used and abused psychoactive drug in the United States. Of those seeking treatment 50% will relapse in the first few months of therapy. Everyone around these patients is effected by this disease. Nursing is on the forefront of the battle these individuals undertake. Alcohol use is broken down into two categories abuse and dependence. Alcohol abuse is characterized as a pattern of use leading to one or more manifestations in a period of a year such as a failure to fulfill major roles or obligations at work, school or home. Recurrent alcohol related legal problems or being in physically hazardous situations and continued use despite problems with relationships caused by or exacerbated by alcohol. Alcohol dependence is a pattern of three or more manifestations in a year such as having a tolerance to alcohol, showing signs of withdrawal, consuming larger amounts or over longer periods than had intended. Continued use of alcohol despite desire or failed attempts to cut down consumption. Drinking and recovering from use takes up more and more time. Continued use despite knowing it is doing damage physically or psychologically, as well as those listed above for abuse. Alcohol not only effects those who are abusing or dependent on the drug, but everyone around them. As a child I remember the late night phone call my mother received that her father, only 49 years old, had passed away after having too much to drink, vomited and aspirated his stomach contents. He was an abuser, a weekend social drinker whose life alcohol had very little impact on until that night, then it had the ultimate impact. A patient I took care of many years ago had a similar experience, he was a young man in his early 30’s, he too aspirated after vomiting, he survived this initially only to be left with damage to his brain from a lack of oxygen. He would live the rest of his life in a coma like state, with a grieving wife and child. Alcohol is a treatable disease, when a patient comes to a hospital or clinic, they have chosen to undertake the battle of their lives. They are not able to do this alone, the attitudes of family and nurses as well as others they may come into contact with are crucial. A compassionate nurse can change the life of a patient, as well as an unsympathetic nurse whose attitude may be “they did this to themselves.” Alcohol dependence or abuse should be seen for what it is a real disease that needs real treatment. These patients need all the support they can get from those around them, and education on the subject is paramount to recognizing the signs and symptoms that manifest. Education for healthcare workers so they understand these patients, as well as how to successfully treat them with medications, together with the patient’s desire to enter therapy will hopefully change that 50% to 25% or better 0% relapse in first few months.

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Alcohol addiction is a disease, comment

December 8, 2010

Assessing patients with potential alcohol abuse for mental illness is difficult. Alcohol abuse can mimic a mental illness so it is important to assess carefully. In some cases with mental illness it is necessary to have a period of abstinence of use of alcohol in order to accurately assess the patient for a mental illness. As stated in the article a visual assessment of the patients ability to take care of themselves can be helpful in diagnosis. When there is a dual diagnoses of alcohol abuse and mental illness an accurate assessment will enable a holistic treatment of both the alcohol abuse and the mental illness.

Original Post
July 9, 2010
Title: Alcohol addiction is a disease, comment
Alcohol impacts the lives of many individuals. Alcohol is a dangerous drug that is widely used and abused. There is evidence everywhere in our society, advertisements, socials events, sporting events, alcohol is everywhere. While there are many who can drink responsibly and not get to the point of alcohol being a problem in their life, there is a large percent of our population that has alcoholism. This is a very difficult disease, since there is no cure, no medicine it is something a patient has to overcome this disease using willpower and other methods requiring mental strength.

The nurse’s assessment plays a role in identifying if alcohol or any other substance may be controlling and having a negative effect on a patient’s life. During the assessment the nurse can identify alcohol dependence, abuse, or addictions. The patient may not even realize they have an alcohol problem the nurse can not only assist the patient in identifying a problem they can provide education to assist the patient in finding and evaluating treatment options. The nurse can also educate the patient during the assessment on how alcohol affects the body and mind short term and long term.

Advanced nursing assessment and forensic nursing may overlap on matters that may be related in some emergency situations caused from alcohol abuse. A forensic nurse may be involved in the care of a patient in the ER from an alcohol related incident. In this circumstance a forensic nurse would be required to utilize her advanced assessment skills to care for the patient as well as fulfill her role as a forensic nurse.

Original Post

September 28, 2009

Title: Alcohol addiction is a disease

Alcohol is the most commonly used and abused psychoactive drug in the United States. Of those seeking treatment 50% will relapse in the first few months of therapy. Everyone around these patients is effected by this disease. Nursing is on the forefront of the battle these individuals undertake. Alcohol use is broken down into two categories abuse and dependence. Alcohol abuse is characterized as a pattern of use leading to one or more manifestations in a period of a year such as a failure to fulfill major roles or obligations at work, school or home. Recurrent alcohol related legal problems or being in physically hazardous situations and continued use despite problems with relationships caused by or exacerbated by alcohol. Alcohol dependence is a pattern of three or more manifestations in a year such as having a tolerance to alcohol, showing signs of withdrawal, consuming larger amounts or over longer periods than had intended. Continued use of alcohol despite desire or failed attempts to cut down consumption. Drinking and recovering from use takes up more and more time. Continued use despite knowing it is doing damage physically or psychologically, as well as those listed above for abuse. Alcohol not only effects those who are abusing or dependent on the drug, but everyone around them. As a child I remember the late night phone call my mother received that her father, only 49 years old, had passed away after having too much to drink, vomited and aspirated his stomach contents. He was an abuser, a weekend social drinker whose life alcohol had very little impact on until that night, then it had the ultimate impact. A patient I took care of many years ago had a similar experience, he was a young man in his early 30’s, he too aspirated after vomiting, he survived this initially only to be left with damage to his brain from a lack of oxygen. He would live the rest of his life in a coma like state, with a grieving wife and child. Alcohol is a treatable disease, when a patient comes to a hospital or clinic, they have chosen to undertake the battle of their lives. They are not able to do this alone, the attitudes of family and nurses as well as others they may come into contact with are crucial. A compassionate nurse can change the life of a patient, as well as an unsympathetic nurse whose attitude may be “they did this to themselves.” Alcohol dependence or abuse should be seen for what it is a real disease that needs real treatment. These patients need all the support they can get from those around them, and education on the subject is paramount to recognizing the signs and symptoms that manifest. Education for healthcare workers so they understand these patients, as well as how to successfully treat them with medications, together with the patient’s desire to enter therapy will hopefully change that 50% to 25% or better 0% relapse in first few months.

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