Archive for the ‘Skin’ Category

The Top 2 Cosmetic Treatments for Men

August 21, 2015

Women don’t have a monopoly on looking good and feeling great about themselves. If there are a few things you’d like to change about your appearance, you simply need to find a man-friendly spa that offers cosmetic treatment for men.

Wrinkle Reduction

Among the most popular medical cosmetic procedures for both women and men is wrinkle reduction. With dermal fillers and Botox, you have a number of options. The right cosmetic specialist will analyze your skin’s needs along with your cosmetic goals and help you decide which treatment is right for you. Either way, the results are instantaneous. You look years or even decades younger as your wrinkles are smoothed away.

Excessive Sweating Treatment

There are few things more embarrassing than excessive sweating, and men experience this problem more often than women. You don’t even have to be working out to experience it. If you sweat whenever you’re nervous and your shirts are stained, ask a cosmetic specialist about using Botox to calm overactive sweat glands.

Schedule an appointment with a spa today and you’ll start walking around with more confidence and a smile on your face. Confident people are more attractive, and attractive people are more confident – so sign up for a simple outpatient procedure as soon as possible.

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The Benefits of Professional Oil Blend Makeup

August 18, 2015

It’s no secret that makeup can be bad for your skin. Despite the fact that you put it on to improve the appearance of your skin, it can actually lead to more problems, which makes you reliant on the products.

How is makeup damaging to your skin? Because it can clog the pores, cause rashes or dry it out; all things that can lead to blemishes, breakouts and basically unhealthy skin; however, what if you found a makeup that is designed to actually help your skin?

Well, there is a type of makeup that can help to improve your skin’s appearance, and that makeup is professional oil blends. Here’s a look at how this specially formulated makeup can improve your skin.

It nourishes your skin. This specially formulated makeup is designed to nourish your skin. That means that instead of drying your skin out or depositing too much oil, this makeup provides your skin with the perfect combination of elements to keep it healthy.

It creates a healthy glow. This makeup creates a healthy glow for your skin. Instead of just covering up your skin and creating a caked-on look, this makeup enhances your skin.

Hepatic Failure

January 31, 2013

Hepatic (liver) failure is the most severe consequence of liver disease. It is caused from massive hepatic necrosis from overuse of drugs, chronic liver disease, or hepatic dysfunction without necrosis. Most people who experience hepatic failure have a liver transplant so that other organ systems do not fail as well. People who have hepatic failure look jaundice. Forensic nurses may see hepatic failure in a variety of patients, including those who were addicted to alcohol or drugs at some point in their lives.

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Importance of Skin Assessment in Elderly and Child Abuse, comment

October 18, 2010

Skin assessment is a more valuable tool than we give it credit or time for. There are so many clues to a long list of health issues; from the varience in color, turgor, texture, temperature and thickness, to hair distribution, and condition of the nails.  All of these variances from norm could be linked to some health issue.  Issues like nutritional deficiency, allergy, local or systemic disease; such as melanoma or systemic lupus erythematosus; or they could be signs or the ‘remnants’ of abuse.

Unfortunately, I don’t think the nurse on the floor routinely gives skin assessment the time or attention needed to pick up on these clues.  The most opportune time to find these signs would be on admission, during the initial assessment. What I see on the floor, is short staffing more often than not, trying to care for more patients than can be fully cared for during their shift, and bed shortages, requiring ‘quick’ turnover.  I am also afraid that the gains in my staffing numbers over the past year are in jeopardy with the reforms and cuts in reimbursement that I think are coming. Thorough assessments are an essential part of health care, of preventative medicine, and all of our professional practices; so I truly hope there will be the time and ability going forward to complete this valuable task.

Original Post

May 26, 2009

Title: Importance of Skin Assessment in Elderly and Child Abuse

In studying skin assessment, one cannot help feeling overwhelmed. Without a desire to pursue dermatology, the unlimited amount of skin lesions, pustules, macules and papules can lead one to skim over information out of the pure necessity for mental sanity. The mind can only hold so many pictures at once. However, I do see the need to ensure the memorization and ability to recognize and diagnose normal skin variations. In reading articles and working with children and the elderly, one unfortunately sees the reality firsthand of physical abuse and neglect. This can often be recognized by assessing the skin. Breakdown, malnutrition, physical abuse, bruises, injuries at different stages of healing can all be noted by a thorogh assessment of the skin. As follow up care and the big picture should always be a part of our thought process in nursing assessment, the ability to note whether a skin assessment finding is simply normal or abnormal is vital to our practice.

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Other Options in Treating the Skin

September 2, 2009

Caring for our skin over the course of a lifetime takes preventative measures, though it is sometimes not always easy to detect a potential problem. When skin issues are reported to a health care provider, a nurse needs to investigate a variety of possibilities that may have caused a negative outcome to specific areas of the body. Stress often aggravates and intensifies certain conditions, with skin being the most visible. When the nervous system is affected negatively with on-going stress, particularly within an abusive relationship, the epidermis can be irritated by itching. Acne, psoriasis, dermatitis and hair loss are related diagnoses from stress-related instances. According to Lehne (2007), “Topical glucocorticoids are employed to relieve inflammation and itching associated with a variety of dermatologic disorders (eg, insect bites, minor burns, seborrheic dermatitis, psoriasis, eczema, pemphigus)” (Pg. 1201). Under the “Actions and Uses” section of this textbook, no other alternatives are discussed for relieving such symptoms, except for the use of medication. Why? With our society becoming more and more accustomed to using drugs as a way to “fix” physical symptoms and concerns, should not the emotional, social and spiritual characteristics of human beings be considered when attempting to properly diagnose patients of all ages. As an example, if a patient were to be removed from his or her daily environment or living conditions changed for a period of time, might negative symptoms diminish or possibly disappear without medication of any kind? With that said, incorporating a more comprehensive approach when evaluating patients may result in a more favorable outcome when treating specific physical ailments. Hormonal effects may also play a role in skin irritations, and coupled with other stressors may cause symptoms such as those listed above. Lehne (2007) noted, “About 85% of teenagers develop acne, which often persists into adulthood. Acne is a chronic skin disorder that usually begins during puberty” (Pg. 1203). While the increase in hormones during this timeframe is significant, so to is the heightened inability to cope with new stressors such as peer pressure and dating. Any type of abusive situations at home could also significantly contribute to a teenagers physical well-being. Lehne (2007) stated in the nondrug therapy for acne, “Dietary measures don’t help” (Pg. 1204). I do not totally agree with this observation, since total health and well-being include nutrition, sleep patterns, family and social interactions and one’s spirituality, any of which may require evaluation to properly diagnose skin conditions. Medication should be carefully administered, with minimal doses considered, in an effort avoid adverse reactions to a patient. Atopic dermatitis (eczema) is often a common skin reaction when stress is heightened. Lehne (2007) defined, “Atopic dermatitis as a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by dry, scaly skin and intense pruritus that often leads to scratching and rubbing, which in turn can lead to erythema, abrasions, rash erosions with an exudates, an increased susceptibility to skin infection. Treating this condition glucocorticoids can cause skin atrophy, hypopigmentation, telangiectasis (permanent focal red lesions)” (Pg. 1212). With the prospects of such reactions, why does the textbook not also suggest other options to reduce such irritating symptoms? To effectively treat patients with any type of skin ailment, nursing professionals should investigate a patient’s background and share such with their doctor before he/she prescribes drug therapy. As a nursing student with a specialized interest and knowledge in domestic violence, I questioned whether current medical/nursing curricula adequately correlates, recognizes and prescribes treatment, both physiological and psychological, for skin conditions and one’s resultant well-being. References Lehne, R.A. (2007). Pharmacology for Nursing Care (Sixth Edition). Pgs. 1201-1212.

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Importance of Skin Assessment in Elderly and Child Abuse

May 26, 2009

In studying skin assessment, one cannot help feeling overwhelmed. Without a desire to pursue dermatology, the unlimited amount of skin lesions, pustules, macules and papules can lead one to skim over information out of the pure necessity for mental sanity. The mind can only hold so many pictures at once. However, I do see the need to ensure the memorization and ability to recognize and diagnose normal skin variations. In reading articles and working with children and the elderly, one unfortunately sees the reality firsthand of physical abuse and neglect. This can often be recognized by assessing the skin. Breakdown, malnutrition, physical abuse, bruises, injuries at different stages of healing can all be noted by a thorogh assessment of the skin. As follow up care and the big picture should always be a part of our thought process in nursing assessment, the ability to note whether a skin assessment finding is simply normal or abnormal is vital to our practice.

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