Archive for the ‘Patient Education’ Category

Important Information About Dental Implants

August 12, 2015

Are you self conscious because you are missing teeth? Do you currently wear dentures and they are uncomfortable, or they fall out all the time? Do you have a bridge that just won’t stay put?

If you answered ‘yes’ to any of these questions, you should talk to your dentist about dental implants. Implants provide you with an effortless dental experience and will allow you to enjoy freedom with your mouth once again. If you are considering having implants installed, here’s a look at some important things that you should know about this form of cosmetic dentistry:

  • A dental implant is surgically placed into the jawbone.
  • Once the implant is installed, the bone will heal around it. This process is called ‘osseointegration’ and this is the reason why dental implants are so strong and stable and a preferred option above traditional dentures.
  • Once the jawbone heals around the implant, the artificial tooth will be attached to the implant, which serves as an artificial, yet permanent root.
  • Once installed, dental implants are strong, sturdy and are the closest thing to your own teeth as you can get.

If you are interested in dental implants, talk to your dentist to talk about the options that are available to you.

Safety of Food Trucks

May 24, 2013

When purchasing a meal from a food truck, make sure the food truck is licensed, has a permit, is registered, and/or is certified. The type of document required depends on the city. Food trucks in Florida is my main reference point of writing. I will widen my perspective to refer to all states as I address each Food Cart in the USA.

Be careful with food borne illnesses such as Botulism, Salmonella poisoning, and E. coli poisoning.

If your city does not regulate food trucks or you are not sure about the safety of a food truck, here are some tips.

  • Make sure the truck is clean inside and outside.
  • Make sure the food handlers use safe methods of handling foods. These may include the use of gloves, hair covers, aprons, and clean towels.
  • Ask customers about their experience using the food truck. Are there any illnesses after eating the food?
  • Check public records. These may be available at the public health department or news outlets.
  • Ask the owner and/or workers about their food safety. Honest and diligent individuals do not mind sharing their food safety procedure. Ask during convenient times. If possible, do not ask during rush hours and when there are long lines of customers.

Alcohol addiction is a disease, comment

January 10, 2011

Alcohol is the most commonly used and abused psychoactive drug in the United States. Of those seeking treatment 50% will relapse in the first few months of therapy. Everyone around these patients is effected by this disease. Nursing is on the forefront of the battle these individuals undertake. Alcohol use is broken down into two categories abuse and dependence. Alcohol abuse is characterized as a pattern of use leading to one or more manifestations in a period of a year such as a failure to fulfill major roles or obligations at work, school or home. Recurrent alcohol related legal problems or being in physically hazardous situations and continued use despite problems with relationships caused by or exacerbated by alcohol. Alcohol dependence is a pattern of three or more manifestations in a year such as having a tolerance to alcohol, showing signs of withdrawal, consuming larger amounts or over longer periods than had intended. Continued use of alcohol despite desire or failed attempts to cut down consumption. Drinking and recovering from use takes up more and more time. Continued use despite knowing it is doing damage physically or psychologically, as well as those listed above for abuse. Alcohol not only effects those who are abusing or dependent on the drug, but everyone around them. As a child I remember the late night phone call my mother received that her father, only 49 years old, had passed away after having too much to drink, vomited and aspirated his stomach contents. He was an abuser, a weekend social drinker whose life alcohol had very little impact on until that night, then it had the ultimate impact. A patient I took care of many years ago had a similar experience, he was a young man in his early 30’s, he too aspirated after vomiting, he survived this initially only to be left with damage to his brain from a lack of oxygen. He would live the rest of his life in a coma like state, with a grieving wife and child. Alcohol is a treatable disease, when a patient comes to a hospital or clinic, they have chosen to undertake the battle of their lives. They are not able to do this alone, the attitudes of family and nurses as well as others they may come into contact with are crucial. A compassionate nurse can change the life of a patient, as well as an unsympathetic nurse whose attitude may be “they did this to themselves.” Alcohol dependence or abuse should be seen for what it is a real disease that needs real treatment. These patients need all the support they can get from those around them, and education on the subject is paramount to recognizing the signs and symptoms that manifest. Education for healthcare workers so they understand these patients, as well as how to successfully treat them with medications, together with the patient’s desire to enter therapy will hopefully change that 50% to 25% or better 0% relapse in first few months.

Healthcare Online Education Consultant

For Helpful Links and more information, click here.

Legal Services for Alcohol Abuse Addiction

Patient Education & Counseling online course

Public Health Nursing online certificate program

Alcohol addiction is a disease, comment

December 8, 2010

Assessing patients with potential alcohol abuse for mental illness is difficult. Alcohol abuse can mimic a mental illness so it is important to assess carefully. In some cases with mental illness it is necessary to have a period of abstinence of use of alcohol in order to accurately assess the patient for a mental illness. As stated in the article a visual assessment of the patients ability to take care of themselves can be helpful in diagnosis. When there is a dual diagnoses of alcohol abuse and mental illness an accurate assessment will enable a holistic treatment of both the alcohol abuse and the mental illness.

Original Post
July 9, 2010
Title: Alcohol addiction is a disease, comment
Alcohol impacts the lives of many individuals. Alcohol is a dangerous drug that is widely used and abused. There is evidence everywhere in our society, advertisements, socials events, sporting events, alcohol is everywhere. While there are many who can drink responsibly and not get to the point of alcohol being a problem in their life, there is a large percent of our population that has alcoholism. This is a very difficult disease, since there is no cure, no medicine it is something a patient has to overcome this disease using willpower and other methods requiring mental strength.

The nurse’s assessment plays a role in identifying if alcohol or any other substance may be controlling and having a negative effect on a patient’s life. During the assessment the nurse can identify alcohol dependence, abuse, or addictions. The patient may not even realize they have an alcohol problem the nurse can not only assist the patient in identifying a problem they can provide education to assist the patient in finding and evaluating treatment options. The nurse can also educate the patient during the assessment on how alcohol affects the body and mind short term and long term.

Advanced nursing assessment and forensic nursing may overlap on matters that may be related in some emergency situations caused from alcohol abuse. A forensic nurse may be involved in the care of a patient in the ER from an alcohol related incident. In this circumstance a forensic nurse would be required to utilize her advanced assessment skills to care for the patient as well as fulfill her role as a forensic nurse.

Original Post

September 28, 2009

Title: Alcohol addiction is a disease

Alcohol is the most commonly used and abused psychoactive drug in the United States. Of those seeking treatment 50% will relapse in the first few months of therapy. Everyone around these patients is effected by this disease. Nursing is on the forefront of the battle these individuals undertake. Alcohol use is broken down into two categories abuse and dependence. Alcohol abuse is characterized as a pattern of use leading to one or more manifestations in a period of a year such as a failure to fulfill major roles or obligations at work, school or home. Recurrent alcohol related legal problems or being in physically hazardous situations and continued use despite problems with relationships caused by or exacerbated by alcohol. Alcohol dependence is a pattern of three or more manifestations in a year such as having a tolerance to alcohol, showing signs of withdrawal, consuming larger amounts or over longer periods than had intended. Continued use of alcohol despite desire or failed attempts to cut down consumption. Drinking and recovering from use takes up more and more time. Continued use despite knowing it is doing damage physically or psychologically, as well as those listed above for abuse. Alcohol not only effects those who are abusing or dependent on the drug, but everyone around them. As a child I remember the late night phone call my mother received that her father, only 49 years old, had passed away after having too much to drink, vomited and aspirated his stomach contents. He was an abuser, a weekend social drinker whose life alcohol had very little impact on until that night, then it had the ultimate impact. A patient I took care of many years ago had a similar experience, he was a young man in his early 30’s, he too aspirated after vomiting, he survived this initially only to be left with damage to his brain from a lack of oxygen. He would live the rest of his life in a coma like state, with a grieving wife and child. Alcohol is a treatable disease, when a patient comes to a hospital or clinic, they have chosen to undertake the battle of their lives. They are not able to do this alone, the attitudes of family and nurses as well as others they may come into contact with are crucial. A compassionate nurse can change the life of a patient, as well as an unsympathetic nurse whose attitude may be “they did this to themselves.” Alcohol dependence or abuse should be seen for what it is a real disease that needs real treatment. These patients need all the support they can get from those around them, and education on the subject is paramount to recognizing the signs and symptoms that manifest. Education for healthcare workers so they understand these patients, as well as how to successfully treat them with medications, together with the patient’s desire to enter therapy will hopefully change that 50% to 25% or better 0% relapse in first few months.

Healthcare Online Education Consultant

For Helpful Links and more information, click here.

Legal Services for Alcohol Abuse Addiction

Patient Education & Counseling online course

Public Health Nursing online certificate program

Alcohol addiction is a disease, comment

July 15, 2010

When assessing a patient with potential or actual alcohol abuse it is important to assess their mental health status as well and realize how closely alcohol abuse and mental illness go hand in hand. In obtaining information clients should feel a good level of comfort with the nurse in order to disclose information willingly about alcohol intake. Many patients with mental illnesses such as depression and bipolar disorder that are undiagnosed will self medicate with alcohol. Obtaining a good family mental health history as well as collecting an inventory about emotions and feelings may help the nurse identify patients at risk for alcoholism. A nurse should also be aware at risk factors for depression and anxiety and collect good subjective and objective data during the patient interview. A persons ability to care for themselves and personal hygiene are good examples of objective data collection. Another piece of valuable information is a patients support system and living arrangements. A nurse should document a patients orientation, memory, communication skills and reasoning. The Audit and Cage tests can be used in a more structured assessment for alcohol abuse as additional supportive data. Alcoholism is a complicated disease that has many factors to address when helping a patient to find the resources to overcome it. Treating a patient holistically when considering alcoholism will allow the nurse to identify predisposing or precipitating factors of this disease.

Original Post
July 9, 2010
Title: Alcohol addiction is a disease, comment
Alcohol impacts the lives of many individuals. Alcohol is a dangerous drug that is widely used and abused. There is evidence everywhere in our society, advertisements, socials events, sporting events, alcohol is everywhere. While there are many who can drink responsibly and not get to the point of alcohol being a problem in their life, there is a large percent of our population that has alcoholism. This is a very difficult disease, since there is no cure, no medicine it is something a patient has to overcome this disease using willpower and other methods requiring mental strength.

The nurse’s assessment plays a role in identifying if alcohol or any other substance may be controlling and having a negative effect on a patient’s life. During the assessment the nurse can identify alcohol dependence, abuse, or addictions. The patient may not even realize they have an alcohol problem the nurse can not only assist the patient in identifying a problem they can provide education to assist the patient in finding and evaluating treatment options. The nurse can also educate the patient during the assessment on how alcohol affects the body and mind short term and long term.

Advanced nursing assessment and forensic nursing may overlap on matters that may be related in some emergency situations caused from alcohol abuse. A forensic nurse may be involved in the care of a patient in the ER from an alcohol related incident. In this circumstance a forensic nurse would be required to utilize her advanced assessment skills to care for the patient as well as fulfill her role as a forensic nurse.

Original Post

September 28, 2009

Title: Alcohol addiction is a disease

Alcohol is the most commonly used and abused psychoactive drug in the United States. Of those seeking treatment 50% will relapse in the first few months of therapy. Everyone around these patients is effected by this disease. Nursing is on the forefront of the battle these individuals undertake. Alcohol use is broken down into two categories abuse and dependence. Alcohol abuse is characterized as a pattern of use leading to one or more manifestations in a period of a year such as a failure to fulfill major roles or obligations at work, school or home. Recurrent alcohol related legal problems or being in physically hazardous situations and continued use despite problems with relationships caused by or exacerbated by alcohol. Alcohol dependence is a pattern of three or more manifestations in a year such as having a tolerance to alcohol, showing signs of withdrawal, consuming larger amounts or over longer periods than had intended. Continued use of alcohol despite desire or failed attempts to cut down consumption. Drinking and recovering from use takes up more and more time. Continued use despite knowing it is doing damage physically or psychologically, as well as those listed above for abuse. Alcohol not only effects those who are abusing or dependent on the drug, but everyone around them. As a child I remember the late night phone call my mother received that her father, only 49 years old, had passed away after having too much to drink, vomited and aspirated his stomach contents. He was an abuser, a weekend social drinker whose life alcohol had very little impact on until that night, then it had the ultimate impact. A patient I took care of many years ago had a similar experience, he was a young man in his early 30’s, he too aspirated after vomiting, he survived this initially only to be left with damage to his brain from a lack of oxygen. He would live the rest of his life in a coma like state, with a grieving wife and child. Alcohol is a treatable disease, when a patient comes to a hospital or clinic, they have chosen to undertake the battle of their lives. They are not able to do this alone, the attitudes of family and nurses as well as others they may come into contact with are crucial. A compassionate nurse can change the life of a patient, as well as an unsympathetic nurse whose attitude may be “they did this to themselves.” Alcohol dependence or abuse should be seen for what it is a real disease that needs real treatment. These patients need all the support they can get from those around them, and education on the subject is paramount to recognizing the signs and symptoms that manifest. Education for healthcare workers so they understand these patients, as well as how to successfully treat them with medications, together with the patient’s desire to enter therapy will hopefully change that 50% to 25% or better 0% relapse in first few months.

Legal Services for Alcohol Abuse Addiction

Patient Education & Counseling online course

Public Health Nursing online certificate program

Forensic Nursing Online Certificate Program

Forensic Nursing Online Introduction Course

Online Advanced Nursing Health Assessment Course

Alcohol addiction is a disease, comment

July 9, 2010

Alcohol impacts the lives of many individuals.  Alcohol is a dangerous drug that is widely used and abused.  There is evidence everywhere in our society, advertisements, socials events, sporting events, alcohol is everywhere.  While there are many who can drink responsibly and not get to the point of alcohol being a problem in their life, there is a large percent of our population that has alcoholism.  This is a very difficult disease, since there is no cure, no medicine it is something a patient has to overcome this disease using willpower and other methods requiring mental strength.

The nurse’s assessment plays a role in identifying if alcohol or any other substance may be controlling and having a negative effect on a patient’s life.  During the assessment the nurse can identify alcohol dependence, abuse, or addictions.  The patient may not even realize they have an alcohol problem the nurse can not only assist the patient in identifying a problem they can provide education to assist the patient in finding and evaluating treatment options.  The nurse can also educate the patient during the assessment on how alcohol affects the body and mind short term and long term.

Advanced nursing assessment and forensic nursing may overlap on matters that may be related in some emergency situations caused from alcohol abuse.  A forensic nurse may be involved in the care of a patient in the ER from an alcohol related incident.  In this circumstance a forensic nurse would be required to utilize her advanced assessment skills to care for the patient as well as fulfill her role as a forensic nurse.

Original Post

September 28, 2009

Title: Alcohol addiction is a disease

Alcohol is the most commonly used and abused psychoactive drug in the United States. Of those seeking treatment 50% will relapse in the first few months of therapy. Everyone around these patients is effected by this disease. Nursing is on the forefront of the battle these individuals undertake. Alcohol use is broken down into two categories abuse and dependence. Alcohol abuse is characterized as a pattern of use leading to one or more manifestations in a period of a year such as a failure to fulfill major roles or obligations at work, school or home. Recurrent alcohol related legal problems or being in physically hazardous situations and continued use despite problems with relationships caused by or exacerbated by alcohol. Alcohol dependence is a pattern of three or more manifestations in a year such as having a tolerance to alcohol, showing signs of withdrawal, consuming larger amounts or over longer periods than had intended. Continued use of alcohol despite desire or failed attempts to cut down consumption. Drinking and recovering from use takes up more and more time. Continued use despite knowing it is doing damage physically or psychologically, as well as those listed above for abuse. Alcohol not only effects those who are abusing or dependent on the drug, but everyone around them. As a child I remember the late night phone call my mother received that her father, only 49 years old, had passed away after having too much to drink, vomited and aspirated his stomach contents. He was an abuser, a weekend social drinker whose life alcohol had very little impact on until that night, then it had the ultimate impact. A patient I took care of many years ago had a similar experience, he was a young man in his early 30’s, he too aspirated after vomiting, he survived this initially only to be left with damage to his brain from a lack of oxygen. He would live the rest of his life in a coma like state, with a grieving wife and child. Alcohol is a treatable disease, when a patient comes to a hospital or clinic, they have chosen to undertake the battle of their lives. They are not able to do this alone, the attitudes of family and nurses as well as others they may come into contact with are crucial. A compassionate nurse can change the life of a patient, as well as an unsympathetic nurse whose attitude may be “they did this to themselves.” Alcohol dependence or abuse should be seen for what it is a real disease that needs real treatment. These patients need all the support they can get from those around them, and education on the subject is paramount to recognizing the signs and symptoms that manifest. Education for healthcare workers so they understand these patients, as well as how to successfully treat them with medications, together with the patient’s desire to enter therapy will hopefully change that 50% to 25% or better 0% relapse in first few months.

Legal Services for Alcohol Abuse Addiction

Patient Education & Counseling online course

Public Health Nursing online certificate program

Forensic Nursing Online Certificate Program

Forensic Nursing Online Introduction Course

Online Advanced Nursing Health Assessment Course

Alcohol addiction is a disease

September 28, 2009

Alcohol is the most commonly used and abused psychoactive drug in the United States. Of those seeking treatment 50% will relapse in the first few months of therapy. Everyone around these patients is effected by this disease. Nursing is on the forefront of the battle these individuals undertake. Alcohol use is broken down into two categories abuse and dependence. Alcohol abuse is characterized as a pattern of use leading to one or more manifestations in a period of a year such as a failure to fulfill major roles or obligations at work, school or home. Recurrent alcohol related legal problems or being in physically hazardous situations and continued use despite problems with relationships caused by or exacerbated by alcohol. Alcohol dependence is a pattern of three or more manifestations in a year such as having a tolerance to alcohol, showing signs of withdrawal, consuming larger amounts or over longer periods than had intended. Continued use of alcohol despite desire or failed attempts to cut down consumption. Drinking and recovering from use takes up more and more time. Continued use despite knowing it is doing damage physically or psychologically, as well as those listed above for abuse. Alcohol not only effects those who are abusing or dependent on the drug, but everyone around them. As a child I remember the late night phone call my mother received that her father, only 49 years old, had passed away after having too much to drink, vomited and aspirated his stomach contents. He was an abuser, a weekend social drinker whose life alcohol had very little impact on until that night, then it had the ultimate impact. A patient I took care of many years ago had a similar experience, he was a young man in his early 30’s, he too aspirated after vomiting, he survived this initially only to be left with damage to his brain from a lack of oxygen. He would live the rest of his life in a coma like state, with a grieving wife and child. Alcohol is a treatable disease, when a patient comes to a hospital or clinic, they have chosen to undertake the battle of their lives. They are not able to do this alone, the attitudes of family and nurses as well as others they may come into contact with are crucial. A compassionate nurse can change the life of a patient, as well as an unsympathetic nurse whose attitude may be "they did this to themselves." Alcohol dependence or abuse should be seen for what it is a real disease that needs real treatment. These patients need all the support they can get from those around them, and education on the subject is paramount to recognizing the signs and symptoms that manifest. Education for healthcare workers so they understand these patients, as well as how to successfully treat them with medications, together with the patient’s desire to enter therapy will hopefully change that 50% to 25% or better 0% relapse in first few months.

Legal Services for Alcohol Abuse Addiction

Patient Education & Counseling online course

Public Health Nursing online certificate program

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Medication Errors Curtailed Using Patient Education

June 16, 2009

Nurses can cause medication errors as they hand out the medications. To prevent this a nurse can use the 5 rights. Right drug, right patient, right dose, right route, right time all need to be thought of before the nurse passes medications. As the original post states another way problems can occur is by the patients, what is not mentioned is the fact that the nurse also has a hand in preventing the errors by the patient! The responsibility of educating the patient about a medication can be the nurses. As a nurse I can teach the patient about the medication like the side effects that are expected, and the ones they should notify their physician if they starting to have. I can teach them about the interactions between the new drug they are prescribed and the other medications they take. What should they do if they miss a dose, take an extra the next time or will that cause more harm than missing a dose? Foods have different effects on medications, some helpful, some harmful. Some medications can be crushed to help in administering others can not. All these are things a patient may not be aware of. Even though most of this information comes on a sheet when we get prescriptions filled now a days, nurses are able to teach the patients in case they do not read the papers. Our understanding of the pharmacology of a medication is crucial in our ability to help our patients. We can do this by keeping up to date with new medications, and looking up any older medication we are not familiar with before we speak to the patient. It is not only our action of passing medications on the hospital floor, it is the conversation we have with the patient as we did it.

Original Post:
May 29, 2009
Title; Medication Errors
Nurses can cause medication errors as they hand out the medications. To prevent this a nurse can use the 5 rights. Right drug, right patient, right dose, right route, right time all need to be thought of before the nurse passes medications. As the original post states another way problems can occur is by the patients, what is not mentioned is the fact that the nurse also has a hand in preventing the errors by the patient! The responsibility of educating the patient about a medication can be the nurses. As a nurse I can teach the patient about the medication like the side effects that are expected, and the ones they should notify their physician if they starting to have. I can teach them about the interactions between the new drug they are prescribed and the other medications they take. What should they do if they miss a dose, take an extra the next time or will that cause more harm than missing a dose? Foods have different effects on medications, some helpful, some harmful. Some medications can be crushed to help in administering others can not. All these are things a patient may not be aware of. Even though most of this information comes on a sheet when we get prescriptions filled now a days, nurses are able to teach the patients in case they do not read the papers. Our understanding of the pharmacology of a medication is crucial in our ability to help our patients. We can do this by keeping up to date with new medications, and looking up any older medication we are not familiar with before we speech to the patient. It is not only our action of passing medications on the hospital floor, it is the conversation we have with the patient as we did it.

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Benadryl: To Give or Not To Give

March 8, 2009

Benadryl is a wonderful antihistamine when used correctly.  As a parent to five children ages 10 – 3, I have used Benadryl many times over the years.  I have never used it to calm my child or to make a ride better as I know many parents have done.  What many parents, regardless of their educational background, do not take into consideration is that Benadryl is a DRUG.  Although it is over the counter it is not a benign medication.  There can be serious side effects.  In reading the other blogs, the one that really touched me was the mother who gave her 12mo old the medication because they were traveling to Iowa but the outcome was a tragic and sad one. 

As a medical professional I believe it is my responsibility to instruct and educate parents on the correct usage and dosage of any drug prescribed but also to educate on possible over the counter medications that may be used.  As an example of how some parents are either too stupid to have children or we should insist on parenting classes prior to letting them take children home, I have a very true story about how education could have made a very big difference.  I was working midnights in a small rural hospital in SC when we saw an infant around 5 mos old for severe otitis media and strep with a fever of nearly 104.  I remember this child well because of the following events.  We prescribed Amoxicillin and Tylenol Suppositories.  Being a relatively new nurse and frustrated by the nights events I didn’t instruct the mother on how to give either medication.  In my mind it was the Pharmacists responsibility.  Well, about 2 days later the mother brought the child back in and she was worse.  Now, I didn’t have children at the time so I figured she was just an over anxious mother.  When the child was triaged the mother kept saying the medication wasn’t working and she had been giving it the way the bottles said and that the child’s fever wasn’t going down.  You could tell she was very concerned and clueless.  When the child was brought back the physician asked for the old chart from 2 nights before.  After reviewing it and seeing I was the nurse he called me over and asked me to assist him with the child.  I had not noted any instructions on the medication so the doctor simply asked the mother to explain how she had been giving the medication.  She explained that she had been giving the child 3 1/2tsp per day of the Amoxicillin and the suppositories she had only given one because the child screamed so horrible when she gave it.  To make a very long story short, the mother had been pouring the Amoxicillin into the child’s ears and she had not removed the silver packaging from the suppository.  We had to irrigate the child’s ears and call an ENT to see the child and then we had to remove what was left of the silver packaging from her rectum.  The mother very innocently said no one told her how to give the medication and she assumed since the child had an ear infection the medication would go into her ear!!

Although this is a somewhat funny story it could have had an equally tragic ending just as the Benadryl incident.  We need to see that we educate our patients regardless if this is their first or fifth child and regardless of what we presume their educational level to be.

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