Archive for the ‘Female Genital Mutilation’ Category

Female Genital Mutilation

March 27, 2013

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is recognized internationally as a violation of the human rights of girls and women. It reflects deep-rooted inequality between the sexes, and constitutes an extreme form of discrimination against women. It is nearly always carried out on minors and is a violation of the rights of children. The practice also violates a person’s rights to health, security and physical integrity, the right to be free from torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment, and the right to life when the procedure results in death. Procedures are mostly carried out on young girls sometime between infancy and age 15, and occasionally on adult women. In Africa, about three million girls are at risk for FGM annually. Between 100 to 140 million girls and women worldwide are living with the consequences of FGM. In Africa, about 92 million girls age 10 years and above are estimated to have undergone FGM. The practice is most common in the western, eastern and north-eastern regions of Africa, in some countries of Asia and the Middle East, and among certain immigrant communities in North America and Europe. Since 1997, great efforts on the part of the World Health Organization (WHO) have been made to counteract FGM, through research, work within communities, and changes in public policy. Progress at both international and local levels includes wider international involvement to stop FGM, development of international monitoring bodies and resolutions that condemn the practice, revised legal frameworks and growing political support to end FGM, and in some countries, decreasing practice of FGM, and an increasing number of women and men in practicing communities who declare their support to end it. Research shows that, if practicing communities themselves decide to abandon FGM, the practice can be eliminated very rapidly. WHO efforts to eliminate female genital mutilation focus on developing publications and advocacy tools for international, regional and local efforts to end FGM within a generation; generating knowledge about the causes and consequences of the practice, how to eliminate it and how to care for those who have experienced FGM; and developing training materials and guidelines for health professionals to help them treat and counsel women who have undergone procedures. WHO is particularly concerned about the increasing trend for medically trained personnel to perform FGM. WHO strongly urges health professionals not to perform such procedures. (2008). Female genital mutilation. World Health Organization Fact Sheets, (no. 241).

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Female Genital Mutilation, comment

December 24, 2009

Female Genital Mutilation is form of ritual that has been performed in many countries for centuries. Female genital mutilation is a form of female circumcision in which the female’s clitorus is completely removed. This procedure often leads to infection, scaring, and both physical and emotional trauma. Having such an invasive procedure done on a women’s genitalia leaves a greater possibility for infection and disease to set in. As the previous post states, it is looked down upon by most of the world and is seen as criminal in the global perspective. However, women around the world are still having this procedure performed on them despite the negative side effects. In my opinion this is a form of abuse towards women and a means of keeping women in submission to their society. I think that women who are seen in health care need to be very sensitive to this issue and work to understand where the patients are coming from both emotionally, mentally, and any physical issues they may be dealing with.

Original Post
May 26, 2009
Title: Female Genital Mutilation
Female Genital Mutilation is a religious ritual which dates back hundreds of years making it very obsolete and presently viewed as criminal on a global perspective. The practice has been addressed through many forums such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948; United Nations convention on the Right of the Child, 1959; African Charter on Rights and Welfare of the Child, 1990; Declaration on Violence Against Women in 1993; High Commission on Refugees Statement against Gender Based violence, 1996. All forums strongly disagree with the practice and encourage the enforcement of the law. There is no easy solution to female genital mutilation. Respect for lives at risk must take precedence over a cultural tradition. And the communities need to be educated to such. I can see the need in health care for education to the professionals who take care of these patients. Education on the ritual and the possible complications. And education regarding the sensitivity of the situation when approaching these patients for they are probably affected physically, psychology, and socially.

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FGM Practices

September 2, 2009

Cultural practices that violate human rights and the health status of the individual create ethical dilemmas for nurses. Protecting human rights/ well-beings and respecting/honoring cultural valves is the foundation for nursing. Before reading the chapter on female genital mutilation (FGM) I must admit I knew very little about this practice, how wild spread it is and the physical and psychological scarring it leaves on the individual. After educating myself by researching this topic, I concluded that due to its long term physiological and psychological health consequences that FGM is very similar to forms of torture, in that it seeks to control the mind, body and sexuality, which is a direct infringement on human rights. Those that accept this practice believe that the benefits (enhancing fertility or a religious requirement) out weight the risks (maternal infant morbidity and mortality). For most, customs and beliefs are deeply ingrained and passed on to the next generation. Healthcare conflict arises when cultural value imposes on human rights, for example, the patient who had just given birth to a baby girl confides in the nurse about the need to have daughter secretly circumcised. The right to privacy and confidentiality will be violated to protect the health and well-being of the baby because FGM is considered a form of abuse in the United Stated and nurses are mandated by law to report suspected or actual cases. The health consequences of those that undergo the FGM procedure varies according to the type of procedure performed, ranging from STDs’ to sterility. Nurses are in a position to changing harmful traditional practices by raising awareness/educating communities about the impact that this practice has on the health status and human right issues.

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Female Genital Mutilation

June 12, 2009

Well, this is an appalling topic. It would be very easy to say, my God, what is the matter with these people? That they would do this to a child is horrible. This practice is meant to control a woman in many aspects. Most religious and cultural practices have the aim of keeping control over women and taking their rights and handing them to men. In modern, independent women, these ideas are preposterous. While many Muslim women remain under the thumb of their husbands and fathers, their Christian counterparts continue to seek their own freedoms. This is illustrated in manner of dress and public behavior. So pointing out that any cultural practices are "wrong" would not be met with anything but scorn. Women go to doctors to have their vaginal openings made smaller to be more "accommodating" to their husbands. How is this different from FGM? I surely makes catheterization a real challenge. While I certainly think mutilating girl children is a horrible practice, it would be very hard to explain to the people that do practice it, why they should stop it. While we don’t remove everything to limit sexual pleasure, don’t we cut circumcise our boys out of habit/culture/religious practice? These acts seem the same to me.

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Female Genital Mutilation

May 26, 2009

Female Genital Mutilation is a religious ritual which dates back hundreds of years making it very obsolete and presently viewed as criminal on a global perspective. The practice has been addressed through many forums such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948; United Nations convention on the Right of the Child, 1959; Africian Charter on Rights and Welfare of the Child, 1990; Declaration on Violence Against Women in 1993; High Commission on Refugees Statement against Gender Based violence, 1996. All forums strongly disagree with the practice and encourage the enforcement of the law. There is no easy solution to female genital mutilation. Respect for lives at risk must take precedence over a cultural tradition. And the communities need to be educated to such. I can see the need in health care for education to the professionals who take care of these patients. Education on the ritual and the possible complications. And education regarding the sensitivity of the situation when approaching these patients for they are probably affected physically, psychology, and socially.

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