Archive for the ‘Ethnic Sensitivity’ Category

Cultural Competency in the Mexican Culture: Understanding La Curandero

June 9, 2009

La Curandero (male) or curandera (female) is a term used to describe a religious specialist who uses supernatural power in curing. Though discriminated and rejected by many in the medical community and non-Hispanic cultures, curanderos are highly respected, religious, spiritual healers in traditional Mexican communities. Curanderos believe that most illnesses originate from God, evil spirits, or curses. They incorporate the use of herbs, natural remedies, rituals, prayers, songs, and ceremonies to heal the sick. Cultural competency allows the forensic nurse to recognize the benefits of spiritual and emotional healing by the curandero, and develop a cohesive relationship while clients receive modern medical care. It is imperative that these diverse entities work in conjunction with each other in order to successfully attend to and obtain positive outcomes regarding the holistic needs of this culture. References: http://yoyobrain.com/flashcards/show/53326 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/curandero

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Child Abuse in Cultural Diversity Context

June 4, 2009

While studying the chapter on cultural diversity, it made more sense to elaborate on some aspects of cultural diversity which still has a fine line between child abuse and cultural practise. One significant area is the right of African culture where parents make use of spanking as a means of corrective action or discipline. In Nigeria for instance, spanking takes the form of stroking with sticks,ruler or any linear object. Blending this tradition into the American context is another issue altogether. Law enforcement in America sees this type of traditional practice as child abuse and often send social services and child protective cases after parents. Many African families are in dilemma as to how to raise their children when it comes to drawing the line between discipline and child abuse. On observation so far, many families are forced to send their children back to Africa where the society upholds the saying "spare the rod and spoil the child". In recent social gatherings, African families are still debating over this controversy. They believe that the end result is better off if the parents spank the children rather than have the children sent to juvenile camps when their actions get criminal or turns into felonies. They often cite examples from the Bible as the foundation of wisdom and authority when it comes to raising responsible children in today’s society.

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Cultural Competence: A Key Element to Success in Forensic Nursing

June 2, 2009

Cultural competence is a building block vital to the construction of a solid foundation for success in the forensic nursing arena. Knowledge, understanding, and acceptance that cultural diversity exists are the first steps towards achieving cultural competence. Apart from one’s own cultural beliefs, customs, and behaviors, the forensic nurse must demonstrate an ability to communicate among various cultures, in addition to serving as a liaison between them. This skilled communication will facilitate health care delivery appropriate to the client’s cultural background in the following aspects: 1. Illness and injuries can be better defined and under-stood. 2. The individual needs of the client can be respected and addressed. 3. A sense of control on the part of the client can be provided and achieved. Cultural assessments by the forensic nurse must be void of insensitivity and stereotyping, and must be directed individually to each client’s uniqueness in order for cultural competence to exist and flourish in the clinical forensic setting.

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Cultural Sensitivity

May 18, 2009

Without any doubt that our background, culture, heritage, and beliefs as nurses will definitely affect how we approach a client of a different cultural background.  However, in forensic investigation as nurses or health care professionals we all have a set of rules and regulations that we have to follow to complete an assessment, and collect a set of meaningful data that will affect our results in the future.  For instance, a victim of sexual assault, she comes from a tradition that thinks or perceives this act as a death sentence for the entire family.  Her naked body which could only be seen by her husband is now violated by a criminal.  How would manipulating her already scarred body to collect data for our investigation make the family feel?  How can we make the family trust us with their member and help catch “the bad guys”?  It is all their!! We can tactfully approach this situation/family if we follow our nursing skills we were taught.  Understanding cultural differences and respecting it such as our own are essential parts in forensic nursing.  As nurses we have heard it, studied it, and experienced it; it is time we review our materials and practice it like we mean it.

Original Post:
May 13, 2009
Cultural Sensitivity
Being able to treat a patient from another
culture is quite challenging and takes alot of patience and
understanding, when communication is an issue. These patients may not
have the same language, health practices, beliefs and values as your
own, which adds extra challenges. How we interact will depend on our
own heritage, culture and our atitude and view we may have towards
other cultures. Cultural compentacy and sensitivity is key when
assisting these patients. They have as much a right to compentent,
health care as any culture. The United States Department of Health and
human services (USDHHS), Office of Minority Health (OMH) took things a
step further. Any one living in the United States, is offered
appropiate culturally and linguistically health care services. To be
able to meet these requiremens first you need to be culturally
sensitive, don’t sterotype and develope a template that can be used in
the cultural assessment of the patient and family.

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Cultural Sensitivity

May 13, 2009

Being able to treat a patient from another culture is quite challenging and takes alot of patience and understanding, when communication is an issue. These patients may not have the same language, health practices, beliefs and values as your own, which adds extra challenges. How we interact will depend on our own heritage, culture and our atitude and view we may have towards other cultures. Cultural compentacy and sensitivity is key when assisting these patients. They have as much a right to compentent, health care as any culture. The United States Department of Health and human services (USDHHS), Office of Minority Health (OMH) took things a step further. Any one living in the United States, is offered appropiate culturally and linguistically health care services. To be able to meet these requiremens first you need to be culturally sensitive, don’t sterotype and develope a template that can be used in the cultural assessment of the patient and family.

Technorati Tags: , , ,


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