Archive for May, 2009

Hypoglycemic Attack, Comment

May 29, 2009

I saw the same clip you are talking about on the news. I totally agree with you that law enforcement agencies should be educated in this matter. Not just with hypoglycemia but other diseases as well. Now a days law enforcement officers seem to be jumping the gun rather then assessing the real situation. For example, at a local hospital in Houston, Texas, a disoriented man drove up to the emergency entrance and was acting psychotic. He was clearly very ill. This man had no idea what he was saying or had no control over his actions. He continued to make threats towards the medical team when they were trying to help. The police were called to the scene and drew their weapons. Then he started to make verbal threats towards the police officers while making all sorts of hand gestures. When the man seemed to reach for something in his vehicle, the police shot this man 6 times. Since, this hospital was only a level one, they had to life flight him to a different facility. After investigating the crime scene, it turns out that the man was only reaching for a flashlight!

Original Post:
May 27, 2009
Title: Hypoglycemic Attack

Not only is the public ignorant about diseases like Parkinson’s, but other disorders as well. For example, on the news there was a man that seemed to be avading the police when in reality he was having a hypoglycemic attack. When the man finally came to a stop, the police bashed his window in and pulled the man out of his car through the window breaking his arm in multiple places. When they finally drug him out of his car window, they threw him to the ground and continued to beat this man into handcuffs. Had the police actually known about the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia instead of assuming that he was under the influence, this would have saved them a law suit. So, even in law enforcement, there is room for education about different diseases.

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Isn’t that a scary thought?

May 29, 2009

Isn’t that a scary thought? Had the doctors diagnosed this sick woman
correctly, maybe it could have been avoided. I know we all make
mistakes, but what a mistake this was. This is why it so important that
we as nurses do such a thorough assessment on our patients and their
medications. We are the patient’s last line of defense, and their
advocate. I found your post very interesting, so I did some research as
well. Through out the articles that I read, I did not read a single
thing about Andrea Yates being misdiagnosed. How is it possible that
we, as students, are able to see this major medication contraindication
and professional physicians were not? Isn’t that a scary thought?

Original Post:
May 28, 2009
Title: Medication Influences
I’m sure you remember the story of Andrea Yates, the woman who drowned
her five innocent children in 2001. I have never been able to fathom
how a woman/mother could drown her children in less than one hour in
their bathtub, so I decided to do my own research to try and
understand. Before the incident Andrea Yates was diagnosed as being
depressed and had tried to commit suicide twice before. She was under
therapy when given three anti-depressants (Effexor, Remeron, and
Remeron SolTab booster). As I was looking into the medications, I found
that many of the side effects these medications produce such as,
depersonalization and abnormal thinking, aided in her psychosis. Within
one year of her incarceration, doctors were able to correctly diagnose
her as being Bi-Polar/Manic depressive. Not only were these medications
producing psychotic side effects, more importantly, these medications
were contraindicated in patients that suffered from mania, bi-polar
disorders, and history of suicide attempts. So, in my research I have
come to the conclusion that Andrea Yates’ diagnosis should have been
further evaluated along with the many medications that her doctor had
prescribed.

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Over the Counter Medications

May 29, 2009

People should be informed about the risks/dangers of common over the counter drugs. Some common drugs such as Tylenol can be harmful, even potentially lethal when taken in large amounts or overdose causing hepatic necrosis. Until recent years, not much was advertised about Tylenol. I myself had no knowledge of the harmful effects of Tylenol until studying Pharmacology. If people were better informed by the drug companies, injury from otc medications would decrease.

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Toxicity

May 29, 2009

A problem that comes with every medication is the possibility of toxicity. Toxicity is defined as a reaction caused by excessive dosing (Lehne). Yet toxicity can be caused from normal therapeutic dosing used in everyday administration. Some people cultural background makes them more prone to get toxicity and even age or sex puts them at risk. Women metabolize faster then men. Age plays a factor that a small doses may be necessary to prevent toxic reactions. Although some medications can cause organ specific toxicity. Thus causing toxic effects to the liver, kidney, or even the cardiac muscle. Some medications can cause damage to certain organs, thus causing the organ not to function properly. The most common toxic effects happen in the liver or alterations to the cardiac function. Toxicity can also occur when the physician or nurse is unaware of any herbal medications or remedies the patient might be taking. Some medications can react with the herbal medications causing a toxic effect. To prevent always ask if the patient is taking any herbal remedies during your assessment.

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Medication Errors

May 29, 2009

Many problems can arise from medications. Some are caused by the nurses and some are caused by the patients. Medication errors can occur quite often and do occur more than people think. medication errors can happen in a number of different ways; from wrong patient, dose, drug, any violation of the rights of the patient. They can also be caused by an overdose, under dose, even an extra dose. sometimes it can be caused from the dilution of the drug being wrong. The rate of the infusion can also cause and error and sometimes the integrity of the patients vein. Sometime when patient have problems swallowing medications the nurse will ask the physician to crush the medications. Some drugs are not made to be crushed they are made to bypass the stomach and absorb in the intestines, thus cause a medication error and possible toxicity from rapid absorption. The best way to prevent an error is to check and recheck all steps in your medication administration process. verify patient, drug, physician orders.

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Assisted Suicide

May 28, 2009

Assisted suicide is an extremely controversial topic in the news. As nurses we must have a personal as well as professional ethical code of conduct. However, it is inevitable that in our career we will experience this situation. The only state to legalize this practice is Oregon. From an ethical stand point, if I had to administer the lethal dose to a dying patient, I would be religously torn, even though it would relieve the patient of their suffering. This is why studying the legal and ethical subject of pharmacology is so important. It helps us to understand the broad spectrum that medications are used for.

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Concoctions of Death

May 28, 2009

Most people don’t even think of the consequences that are intailed with mixing perscription drugs. Take Heath Ledger or instance, he died tragically from mixing six medications that include sedatives, pain killers and antianxiety drugs. Although this was ruled as an accidental death, suicide was not out of the question. You might wonder how a person would gain access to so many perscription drugs at once. In Heath Ledger’s case, 3 of the 6 medications were perscribed in Europe, and the other in the US. The night that he died, he had taken 2 narcotic painkillers, 3 benzodiazepine tranquilizers and an over the counter sleepaid, which proved to be a deadly concoction. Not only should the doctor oversee druge-drug interaction, but the pharmacies should mandate that before a patient picks up their perscriptions, they must consult with the pharmacist about drug interactions as well.

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Medication Influences

May 28, 2009

I’m sure you remember the story of Andrea Yates, the woman who drowned her five innocent children in 2001. I have never been able to fathom how a woman/mother could drown her children in less than one hour in their bathtub, so I decided to do my own research to try and understand. Before the incident Andrea Yates was diagnosed as being depressed and had tried to commit suicide twice before. She was under therapy when given three anti-depressants (Effexor, Remeron, and Remeron SolTab booster). As I was looking into the medications, I found that many of the side effects these medications produce such as, depersonalization and abnormal thinking, aided in her psychosis. Within one year of her incarceration, doctors were able to correctly diagnose her as being Bi-Polar/Manic depressive. Not only were these medications producing psychotic side effects, more importantly, these medications were contraindicated in patients that suffered from mania, bi-polar disorders, and history of suicide attempts. So, in my research I have come to the conclusion that Andrea Yates’ diagnosis should have been further evaluated along with the many medications that her doctor had prescribed.

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Deposition, comment

May 27, 2009

Thank you for your posting. We provide consultation and preparation service for various types of healthcare workers. These include nurses, physicians, massage therapists, physical therapists, transcriptionists, coders, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, technicians, billing clerks, transporters, occupational therapists, and others.

Original Post:
May 1, 2009
Title: Deposition
I am not a forensic nurse. I was called to give a deposition. I thought
I was prepared because of watching many court shows on television.
Everything was drastically different! When I left the deposition, my
body felt like it was ran over my a Mac truck. I was in tears and I
could not function for the rest of the day. Prior to my deposition, I
wished I had known you were available to help me prepare. Actually I
did not know I needed to prepare. More healthcare workers should know
that your services exist and that they should prepare for depositions.

Original Post:
May 20, 2009
Title: Forensic Nursing Education Consulting, comment
Yes, our organization provides consulting about Forensic Nursing
education. Consulting is provided in-person and/or online. Some of the
most prominent areas include
1. testifying as a forensic nurse
2. depositions
3. overcoming stage fright
4. courtroom testimony

Original Post:
May 18, 2009
Title: Forensic Nursing Education Consulting
Does your organization provide consulting about Forensic Nursing education?

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Variola Virus as a weapon of Biologic terrorism

May 27, 2009

The variola virus causes smallpox. It is very contagoius, highly infectable and life threatening. Due to a global vaccination program, it has been wiped out from us…or has it? The last US case was in 1949, the last case on the planet was in Somalia, in 1977. There is a 30% mortality rate of those that get the disease. In 1972, the vaccine was discontinued in the US., and in 1982, in the rest of the world. So, now if smallpox was to leak out, everyone would be in trouble. It is transmitted person to person by contact with infected or inhaling infected droplets. You can also get it from contaminated clothes or bedding. There is no proven treatment for smallpox, but there is much research being done on the newer antiviral drugs. The only way to prevent smallpox is with the vaccine. Due to fears of it being used as a bioterrorist weapon, military reinstituted it into their mandatory vaccinations in 2003.

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